September 19, 2014
"As many critics have pointed, out, terrorism is not an enemy. It is a tactic. Because the United States itself has a long record of supporting terrorists and using terrorist tactics, the slogans of today’s war on terrorism merely makes the United States look hypocritical to the rest of the world."

Director of the National Security Agency under Ronald Reagan, General William Odom (via priceofliberty)

September 13, 2014
"Do we really want this to be the new normal of the way we interact with the world? Do we want to be doing this all over the world, forever, indefinitely, in counterterrorism campaigns that go on indefinitely and that we don’t call war, just adding new countries to the list of where we do this stuff, every year, year after year…when does it ever stop?"

Rachel Maddow

September 11, 2014
What We Should Remember On 9/11

Last year’s message seems equally relevant today:

On the anniversary of 9/11, we should recommit ourselves to ensuring that we don’t allow fear to determine our public policy choices.  We should learn the unmistakable lesson of the past 12 years: that trading liberty for more security is a false choice that leads us down a dark path.  As Justice Brennan said in 1988:

For as adamant as my country has been about civil liberties during peacetime, it has a long history of failing to preserve civil liberties when it perceived its national security threatened. This series of failures is particularly frustrating in that it appears to result not from informed and rational decisions that protecting civil liberties would expose the United States to unacceptable security risks, but rather from the episodic nature of our security crises. After each perceived security crises ended, the United States has remorsefully realized that the abrogation of civil liberties was unnecessary. but it has proven unable to prevent itself from repeating the error when the next crisis came along.

Let us recommit ourselves to not making this error again.  Those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.

(Source: letterstomycountry)

September 2, 2014
Another Journalist Dies, But Military Intervention Is No Solution

With the apparent death of another journalist at the hands of ISIS, it seems like a good time to reflect on what these executions are actually intended to achieve, and how world governments should respond to it.

Sensational violence is a tool used by extremist groups to draw large countries into guerrilla-style conflicts that they historically cannot win. Asymmetrical warfare is the bailiwick of non-state actors.  It is why the U.S. lost in Vietnam, Russia lost in Afghanistan, and why despite spending billions of dollars and over a decade in Iraq and Afghanistan, neither peace nor political stability have been achieved in either country.  It is the same reason why rockets continue to rain down on Israel despite decades of military attempts to route militants out of Gaza, and also why the British government was unable to bring the IRA to heel through its military might alone.  

There is no military solution to ISIS.  If you want to understand why, I encourage you to read Matthew Hoh’s remarkable and well-informed take on the issue:

American military involvement will serve as an accelerant to and a prolonger of this Iraqi civil war. American bombs, bullets and dollars will further strengthen the bond between Sunnis and extremist groups like ISIS, increasing Sunni desperation by intensifying their backs to the wall dilemma and justifying the propaganda and rhetoric of ISIS: a narrative of a Western campaign of international subjugation enacted through Shia, Kurdish and Iraqi ethnic minority puppets. Further, such American support will strengthen the resolve of the al-Maliki government not to reform and not to address Sunni grievances. With the renewed backing of American might and money, al-Maliki’s government will feel no need to restore a balance of power in Iraq and will continue a policy of disenfranchisement and marginalization of the Sunni population and leadership. Only by withholding support to al-Maliki’s government, and not by sending advisers, tomahawk missiles or cash, will there be a reason for al-Maliki’s government to negotiate and seek peace.

The Iraqi and Kurdish militaries are fighting ISIS, but peace will only be achieved in Iraq when Sunnis are given a meaningful opportunity to participate in Iraq’s Democratic institutions.  Until that happens, groups like ISIS will always be able to take advantage of the resentment of oppressed political minorities in order to create an atmosphere of instability and violence.  Extremism breeds in places where political oppression and poverty are rampant.  Give people access to public institutions, and lift them up economically, and groups like ISIS begin to atrophy and die for lack of a receptive audience.  Extremists still exist in wealthy countries, but they don’t have enough resources or influence to conquer and lord over an entire jurisdiction.  That alone is sufficient to show the effectiveness of economic prosperity and political enfranchisement over military solutions, which can never succeed at stamping out extremist movements without a political solution that enfranchises people and lifts them out of the desperate economic conditions that so often serve as a breeding ground for radical violent movements.

August 24, 2014
"I have not seen any evidence of successful U.S. intervention to stop such violence [as is ongoing in Iraq] in our modern history."

Matthew Hoh, former State Dep’t foreign service officer.  Hoh resigned in 2009 in protest of what he believed to be a counterproductive U.S. military presence in Afghanistan.

See Also: Bombs Are Medication For Guilt, Not Peace, In Iraq

August 8, 2014
"Today, America is coming to help."

President Obama, as he announced tonight that he’s authorized targeted airstrikes in Iraq, along with a humanitarian effort to aid stranded Iraqi civilians who fled advancing Sunni militant fighters. He said the U.S. would not be drawn into war. (via latimes)

LTMC: "He said the U.S. would not be drawn into war."

(via latimes)

July 28, 2014
Anarchy in Libya: Tripoli Fuel Depot Ablaze After Rocket Attack - NBC News

From the article:

TRIPOLI, Libya - A rocket hit a fuel storage tank containing 1.5 million gallons of gasoline, triggering a major blaze as rival brigades of former rebels fought for control of Tripoli’s main airport. A huge cloud of black smoke billowed across the capital’s skyline on Monday and Libya’s government asked for international help to try to contain the disaster. A spokesman for the National Oil Company said the blaze was burning “out of control,” adding that firefighters had withdrawn from the area.

Foreign governments have looked on powerless as anarchy sweeps across the North African oil producer, three years after NATO bombardment helped topple dictator Moammar Gadhafi. The U.S., United Nations and Turkish embassies have already shut operations after the worst violence since the 2011 uprising. Two weeks of clashes among rival factions killed nearly 160 people in Tripoli and the eastern city of Benghazi. Since Gadhafi’s demise, Libya has struggled to keep its transition to democracy on track, with its parliament deadlocked by infighting among factions and militias often using threats of force against political rivals. Many heavily armed former anti-Gadhafi fighters refuse to hand over weapons and continue to rule the streets.

Libya is the foreign policy gift that just keeps on giving.

July 23, 2014
thepeoplesrecord:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Remember that time the U.S. shot down an Iranian civilian airliner over Iranian airspace, killing all 290 on board, including 66 children, and then refused to apologize for doing it?
"I will never apologize for the United States. I don’t care what the facts are. I’m not an apologize-for-America kind of guy." — Vice President (and then-presidential candidate) George H.W. Bush, commenting on the downed airliner, 8/2/1988

That quote makes me sick.

LTMC: I actually did not know about this.  My only defense is that I was 4 years old at the time, and the government apparently did a great job of glossing over the history books on this one.  Also, that GHWB quote is solid gold, thought not as solid as the solid gold dancers.

thepeoplesrecord:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Remember that time the U.S. shot down an Iranian civilian airliner over Iranian airspace, killing all 290 on board, including 66 children, and then refused to apologize for doing it?

"I will never apologize for the United States. I don’t care what the facts are. I’m not an apologize-for-America kind of guy." — Vice President (and then-presidential candidate) George H.W. Bush, commenting on the downed airliner, 8/2/1988

That quote makes me sick.

LTMC: I actually did not know about this.  My only defense is that I was 4 years old at the time, and the government apparently did a great job of glossing over the history books on this one.  Also, that GHWB quote is solid gold, thought not as solid as the solid gold dancers.

July 22, 2014

Is The US Abandoning Afghan Interpreters To Certain Death? - Via Reason TV

July 10, 2014
"I think drones are the most cowardly instruments in the history of warfare. A guy sits in an air-conditioned cage on a padded chair, looking at a TV monitor at an image 4,000 or 5,000 miles away, and we are killing wedding parties and children … We killed an American citizen. I mean, and this is with the total support of the people who bragged about America the most; America, America, the Constitution. And they totally turned their back on the bedrock of the Constitution. We have people in cages for 15 years, no Red Cross, no visitation, no letters, no nothing. For 14, 15 years. No habeas corpus. And these blatant violations are met with silence. We are a nation of law unless we’re scared."

Phil Donahue

"We are a nation of law unless we’re scared."

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